ALL ABOUT MIA – Review by Alice, Queen Elizabeth’s School for Girls

miaI really enjoyed reading “All About Mia” by Lisa Williamson, but I don’t think it is as good as her other book, “The Art of Being Normal”. The main reason I feel this is because I don’t really like the character of Mia.  On the other hand, I do think this book is very well written.  It is nice to have a book about the more popular girls and Lisa Williamson highlighted the problems any girls can experience.  This book made me realise that however good someone’s life might seem, everyone struggles and feels like the odd one out. However good someone is at something, however clever and however popular, no one thinks they fit in.

Overall I really enjoyed reading this book and loved all the twists. I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes reading about family and friendship problems.

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WING JONES – Review by Janison, Queen Elizabeth’s School

wing   I first found out about Wing Jones through Read4Barnet, and the day I finally went to the library with the reason to check out the Read4Barnet books, the first one I picked was Wing Jones. I don’t know why I chose it, but it just looked like the one that should start the whole list. So I started reading it, and finished it that night. This was a book worth reading, while I was reading it, I felt like I was Wing Jones. I could feel her emotion inside me, through Webber’s wonderful way of writing. I never felt lost, and I never felt like stopping. Some books make me want to read on, some books make me want to stop, but this book made me want to read on. After reading it, I felt like if I had a goal, I should try to aim for it, as this book was powerful. On the blurb, Katherine Rundell says it makes you want to pull on your shoes and start running, and it really did, and I am not so much of a sportsperson. Quite the opposite, actually. Continue reading “WING JONES – Review by Janison, Queen Elizabeth’s School”

2017 Shortlist announced!

The Barnet School Librarians have had their heads together again and have put together a shortlist of some must-read books published in the last year for participants to review. We are also very excited that a number of these authors will be joining us for the 30th June Festival of Reading day that will be held at Queen Elizabeth’s School this year!

We will be getting our reading groups started on the list shortly, and publishing their reviews here on the site over the coming months.

Are you a Barnet secondary school librarian? Would you be interested in taking part with your students? Please get in touch with cmurray(at)qebarnet.co.uk for more information!

 

 

Review: The Art of Being Normal, by Ajanth at Queen Elizabeth’s School

The Art of Being NormalDavid, the main character in this book, wants nothing more than just to be a girl, and his shame and embarrassment lead him to tell nobody other than his two best friends. When a new boy arrives at his school, Leo, he tries to distance himself from everyone as much as possible and avoids drawing attention to himself. David soon realises that Leo is also hiding something just like himself. Eventually David manages to become friends with Leo and they find out each other’s secrets.

I enjoyed this book as it was easy to read, and was interesting as it had a strong moral storyline. It’s simple, and rather unusually, it’s not the typical ‘happily ever after’ story you’d expect, and that’s what I love about it. It kept me hooked, and I would highly recommend it.

Review: The Rest of Us Just Live Here, by Tito at Queen Elizabeth’s School for Girls

The Rest of Us Just Live HereThe Rest of Us Just Live Here is a fantastic novel. It is based on the life of a boy named Michael who is in his final semester of high school and the town is about to be taken over by Gods. Michael and his friends must try and graduate and hope that the school does not get blown up (again).

My favourite character is Jared as I found his friendship with Michael very special. I also loved Mel (Michael’s older sister) who was battling an eating disorder and trying to stay strong as their family fell apart. I enjoyed the element of mystery with characters such as Nathan and ‘Call me Steve’ as they made me question who was really behind all the mysterious deaths of the Indie kids.

I would recommend this book to anyone who likes immortals, zombies and vampires. This book would be loved by anyone who enjoys a good adventure.

I’d give this book 8/10 because it was a very entertaining read, however it took a long time for the action to begin. My favourite part of the book was in Chapter 23 when the school was finally blown up as I found it both funny and emotional, and it had a meaningful ending.

 

Review: The Lie Tree, by Anna at Queen Elizabeth’s School for Girls

The Lie TreeThe Lie Tree is a captivating read about a young girl called Faith whose family move to the island of Vane. She is growing up in a male-dominated world and throughout the book she yearns for her own independence and realises that women can be just as intelligent as men.

When her father dies under mysterious circumstances Faith decides to investigate the cause of his death and bring the killer to justice. During her investigation she hears of a tree that is fed off lies. As Faith’s life spirals out of control she realises how few people she can trust and the consequences of a lie that too many people believe…

 

Review: The Art of Being Normal, by Emily at Queen Elizabeth’s School for Girls

The Art of Being NormalThe Art of Being Normal is an amazing novel combining the stories of two boys, Leo and David. All David wants is to be a girl while Leo just wants to finish his school year without any more incidents. They both end up helping each other after an unfortunate case of canteen bullies.

This is an incredible book as it deals not only with growing up but with gender identity and the person you want to be vs. the person you are. I think anyone who enjoys a good reality book should read this and anyone who doesn’t understand gender should read this. It is relatable and real and can be read by both boys and girls. To me, this is a great novel and I highly recommend it.